How much 'adulthood' should a child experience?

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How much 'adulthood' should a child experience?

Postby Roadkill » Tue Aug 16, 2005 1:18 am

In modern society kids grow up with other kids. They spend atleast of third of their day 5 out of 7 days with other kids. It seems standard in modern scoiety. Yet with all our troubles, i have to wonder, is this how it should be?

take for example, one of my cousins. Homeschooled, lives in (or very near) Atlanta. His family works on restoring military vehicles. Very cool dude, but very well mannered and spoken. He's spent his old life with older folks in his family. Never really developed a passion for internet, i don't think. And he's turned out like this. A role model.

Suppose a kid grows up living with older folks. He doesn't see friends his age as often. He learns trade, family traditions, family develops communicates well. he is kept to busy and offered too much fun and interesting activities and projects to do that he doesn't need computer and internet and movies and tv to keep him entertained most of the day.

Is this how the model kid, or family is developed? Is this what are children in order to become better people should have?

Just thoughts.
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Re: How much 'adulthood' should a child experience?

Postby paleofrrrost » Sun Aug 28, 2005 3:49 am

Roadkill wrote:In modern society kids grow up with other kids. They spend atleast of third of their day 5 out of 7 days with other kids. It seems standard in modern scoiety. Yet with all our troubles, i have to wonder, is this how it should be?
<snip>

Just thoughts.


Here are some more thoughts.

How many thousands of years have humans been around? We have written history going back 5000 years or so, and evidence of human societies from long before that.

How many years have "modern" societies had age-segregated government-mandated educational systems? The Prussians (Germans) introduced forced schooling only 150 years or so ago. It quickly spread to all western societies, however, even then many schools in rural areas were "one room schoolhouses", with children of all ages learning things together, being exposed to different things even if it wasn't exactly the lesson they were supposed to be working on.

The first half of the 20th century (i.e. 100-50 years ago) most schools outgrew the one-room concept, and moved on to the age-segregated class structure that is the standard today.

So, humans and human societies developed for thousands and thousand of years with kids growing up around all kinds of people all day long, from babies to adults. That's the "normal" way for humans. Only in the last 50 to 100 years has it become "normal" to be forced into groups of kids defined by narrow age ranges, and herded about for most of the day, five days a week.

One of the really enlightening things you learn when you homeschool is that what takes government schools six hours to teach, you can do in three hours, because at least half of the time that kids spend in school each day is either "crowd management" (okay, you go to this room until the bell rings, then you get up and walk down the hall to another room and sit there 50 minutes, and when the bell rings again you walk over to this room and get something to eat, but listen for the bell that tells you it's time to walk over to another room ...), or is time spent doing busy work while the one teacher works with some of the other 29 (or more) kids in the class.

The "modern" concept of schooling was invented about the same time the "modern" concept of factories was invented. Compulsory public education came along at the same time as the Industrial Revolution, and embodied the same concepts of mass production.

Guess what? Industry has moved on, has matured, has discovered that mass production is not always the best way to do things. In contrast, the people who favor compulsory public education have fought hard to keep things from changing. Did you know as little as 25 years ago it was illegal to homeschool? You could go to jail for trying to homeschool your kids? And you kids could be taken away from you and put in foster care? Only 25 years ago!

People had to risk jail time, fight lawsuits, and fight to get legislation that made homeschooling legal. In the meantime, look at the track record of public education, at least in the USA. Go to a vintage book store and find textbooks from the 1920s. Compare the stuff they were teaching then to what they teach now. I think you will be astounded to see how much more difficult material was taught way back then, compared to what is taught today.

So, schools artificially segregate kids in a way that was unnatural for thousands of years, and teach less now than they did even 75 years ago, and you look at all the problems our society has and you have to wonder if there is a connection.

I think things like FrostJedi.cmo are a great example of "the way things should be", with people of all ages coming together, playing and talking and cussing and discussing everything under the sun.

Just my $0.02
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Postby TerraFrost » Sun Aug 28, 2005 4:02 am

Hmmm - didn't know much about homeschoolings history, myself.

Anyway,heh...

[quote]Guess what? Industry has moved on, has matured, has discovered that mass production is not always the best way to do things.[/quote
Can you give some examples?
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